High fiber diet

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Overview

You often hear the advice: Eat more fiber. But know which fibers are good for your health?

Dietary fiber, those that are found especially in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes are especially known for their capacity to prevent or relieve constipation. But fiber provides other health benefits such as reduced risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

It is not difficult to choose tasty foods that contain fiber. Learn from the following lines how much dietary fiber you need, which are the best foods that contain them and in what form you can incorporate into your meals and snacks.

Dietary fiber also known as the roughage or bulk, includes all the vegetables that the body can’t digest or absorb. Unlike other types of foods such as fats, proteins or carbohydrates – that the body breaks down and it absorbs – fiber is not digested by humans. Therefore, they cross almost intact, the stomach, small intestine, colon, and then re removed. It may seem that fibers are not very important, but rather many essential roles in maintaining health.


Contents

1. Overview
2. In which way fiber helps you lose weight?
3. Fiber at breakfast – a healthy habit to lose weight
4. How much fiber should you eat and how much weight you can lose
5. Top foods high in fiber


In which way fiber helps you lose weight?

Fiber contains no calories and can provide long-term feeling of fullness. There are two types of fiber: insoluble and soluble in water. Water insoluble fiber, found in vegetables, wholemeal bread and cereals increases their volume when reach the stomach. Soluble fiber is found in fruits, vegetables, seeds, oats, being digested more slowly and giving you the sensation of full stomach for a longer period of time.

Fiber provides many additional benefits, including weight control. Foods containing fiber take longer to be eaten, which means that the stomach will be full faster and eat less. Foods with fiber help you by offering the quickly saturated feel and this way you will not be hungry between meals.


Fiber at breakfast – a healthy habit to lose weight

Researchers found that people taking breakfast regularly succeed to maintain constant weight, longer, and grain consumption is one of their rituals. Generally, ingestion of cereals, especially those rich in fiber is beneficial for weight loss. Studies have shown that people who include in their meals more carbohydrates, cereal fiber, weigh less than those who skipped their daily menu.


How much fiber should you eat and how much weight you can lose

Whether you want to lose weight or to hold the weight, experts recommend that adults consume 18 grams of fiber per day (12-24 g). If you want to lose weight should limit intake of calories. Total pounds less may vary, depending on the degree of calorie restriction.

Nutritionists recommend that you not lose weight more than 500 g per week, although in the first week could you lose more, because more water will be eliminated, along with fat.


Top foods high in fiber

1. Bran – A simple way to increase fiber intake is to add bran diet. Bran, cereal varieties regardless of origin are rich in dietary fiber. Oat bran is rich in soluble fiber that reduces blood cholesterol.

Wheat, corn and rice bran are high in insoluble fiber and helps prevent constipation. Bran can be included in your favorite kinds of food, cereal, pancakes, muffins. The most popular of cereals and bran weight loss bars rich in fiber contain bran.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Oat bran, raw – 28 grams – 12 grams
- Wheat bran, crude – 28 grams – 12 grams
- Corn bran, crude – 28 grams – 22 grams
- Rice bran, raw – 28 grams – 6 g
- Bran of one kind of grain – 1/2 cup – 14 g
- A bar with one type of fiber – a bar – 9 g

2. Dry beans – Beans are one of the richest sources of natural fiber, protein, lysine, vitamins and minerals. Some people may experience flatulence or discomfort when eating beans, so it is appropriate that it be introduced gradually, in small amounts in diet. You can choose different varieties of beans, as a replacement for animal protein in the composition stews, gaskets, salads, soups, sauces.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Lima beans, cooked – 1 cup – 14 g
- Adzuki beans, cooked – 1 cup – 14 g
- Beans and broad beans (fava), cooked – 9 g
- Black beans, cooked – 1 cup – 15 g
- Garbanzo beans, cooked – 1 cup – 12 g
- Lentils cooked – 1 cup – 16 g
- Black bean soup, boiled – a helmet – 17 g
- Beans, cooked – 1 cup – 16 g
- White beans, small, cooked – 1 cup – 19 g
- Mung beans, cooked – 1 cup – 15 g
- Yellow beans, cooked – 1 cup 18 g
- Pinto beans, cooked – 1 cup, 15 g

3. Berries – Berries are rich in antioxidants and fiber. These are among the sources of fiber with fewer calories. Berries contain small seeds, whose fiber content is higher than other fruits. You can enjoy berries all year round: fresh summer and winter frozen, canned or dried. Berries can be used for toppings on breakfast cereals, yogurt, salads and desserts.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Raspberries, raw, 1 cup – 8 grams
- Blueberries, raw – 1 cup – 4 g
- Red and white currants, raw – 1 cup – 5 g
- Strawberries, raw – 1 cup – 3 g
- Gooseberry, raw – 1 cup – 6 grams
- Elderberries, raw – 1 cup – 10 g
- Blackberries, raw – 1 cup – 8 grams

4. Whole grains – One of the simplest ways to supplement your fiber intake is to consume whole grains, whatever their type or variety.

Natural grains contain bran, germ and endosperm. By refining, the germs and bran, fiber, protein and other key nutrients are removed from the grains. Whole grains contain all components, essential and natural nutrients. Whole grains can be found in bread, biscuits, snacks, etc.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Amaranth, beans – 1/4 cup – 6 grams
- Polished barley, boiled – 1 cup – 6 grams
- Popcorn – 3 cups – 4 g
- Dry oats – 1/2 cup – 4 g
- Rye flour, dried – 1/2 cup – 4 g
- Millet, cooked – 1 cup – 2 g
- Qinoa, boiled – 1 cup – 5 g
- Triticale, flour, dry – 1/4 cup – 5 g
- Whole grains, dried – 1/4 cup – 5 g
- Wild rice, cooked – 1 cup – 3 g
- Whole wheat flour, dried – 1/4 cup, 4 g
- Brown rice, cooked – 1 cup – 4 g
- Bulgur, boiled – 1 cup – 8 grams
- Whole wheat bread – 1 slice – 2 g
- Biscuits, wafers rye – 30 g – 6 g
- Whole wheat spaghetti, cooked – 1 cup, 6 g

5. Sweet peas – peas, from green peas to dried peas are high in natural fiber. Peas can be eaten fresh, frozen, as garnish, in soups, along with steaks, gaskets, salads, casseroles and sauces.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Black eyed peas, boiled – 1 cup – 11 g
- Pigeon peas, boiled – 1 cup, 9 g
- Green peas, frozen – 1 cup, 14 g

6. Fiber from green vegetables – green leafy vegetables are rich in beta carotene, vitamins, minerals and especially fiber. There are over 1,000 species of plants with edible leaves that have similar nutritional qualities, including high fiber content. Green vegetables can be prepared as salads, sautéed’s with olive oil, garlic, lemon and spices.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Kale, boiled – 1 cup – 5 g
- Green mustard, cooked – 1 cup – 5 g
- Cabbage, boiled – 1 cup – 5 g
- Spinach, cooked – 1 cup – 4 g
- Green beet, boiled – 1 cup – 4 g

7. Nuts and seeds – Nuts and seeds are high in fiber. 30 grams of nuts and seeds can provide a daily dose of fiber, along with healthy fats, protein and phytochemicals. You can scatter some nuts and seeds over breakfast cereals, yogurt, salads or desserts. You will discover a delicious way to incorporate fiber.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Almonds – 30 g – 4 g
- Pistachios – 30 g – 3 g
- Cashew – 30 g – 1 g
- Peanuts – 30 g – 2 g
- Brazil nuts – 30 g – 2 g
- Sunflower seeds – 1/4 cup – 3 g
- Pumpkin seeds – 1/2 to 3 g
- Flax seeds – 30 g – 8 g

8. Brassica family vegetables – vegetables in this family are valued for cancer protection associated with high levels of glucosinolate. These include: broccoli, kale, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, which are rich in fiber. They can be enjoyed with French fries, in casseroles, soups, salads or garnish.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Cabbage, boiled – 1 cup -3 g
- Cauliflower, cooked – 1 cup – 5 g
- Kale, raw – 1 cup – 5 g
- Broccoli, cooked – 1 cup – 5 g
- Brussels sprouts, cooked – 1 cup, 6 g
- Red cabbage, boiled – 1 cup, 4 g

9. Potatoes – A frequently cooked vegetable, the potato is high in fiber. Anyone can handle fiber consumed after a meal during the day, regardless of potato flavor and amount of nutrients it contains. It is preferable to eat the peel too, very rich in fiber. Try adding potatoes prepared in different ways, nuts, salads, steaks, soups, sets, casseroles or simply eat baked potatoes.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Red potatoes with peel – 1 medium potato – 4 g
- Sweet potato with peel – 1 medium potato – 4 g

10. Fruit – To give your body the daily recommended fiber, you can eat fruit. Many of them contain only fiber, but also important vitamins and minerals. Experts advise not to pass the fruit, whether it’s pears, bananas, apples or anything else. In winter you can choose dried fruit. It is recommended that fruit to be eaten both breakfast and during snack, mixed with yogurt, cereal or salads. Fruit is definitely a healthy habit.

Food, Serving, quantity of fruit

- Banana – 1 medium banana – 3 g
- Pears – 1 medium pear – 6 g
- Orange – 1 medium orange – 4 g
- Prunes – 1/2 cup – 6 grams
- Raisins – 55 g – 2 g
- Figs – 1/2 cup, 8 g

11. Exotic fruits and vegetables – Some of the foods with the highest content of fiber in the world are exotic fruits and vegetables, used according to each cultural food traditions worldwide. They can be attractive for both high fiber content, as well as flavor. Perhaps some of them won’t be quite easily accessible, but their use may be a way to rotate and stir frequently consumed foods with fruits that are not so easily accessible.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Play, raw – 1 cup, 6 g
- Carambola, raw – 1 cup 4 g
- Asian pears, raw – a raw fruit, 4 g
- Hearts of palm, boiled – 1 cup, 4 g
- Guava, raw – 1 cup, 9 g
- Straw mushrooms, canned – 1 cup, 5 g
- Lotus root – 10 slices, 4 g
- Avocados, raw – 1/2 fruit 9 g
- Edamame, frozen – 1 cup, 6 g
- Taro, sliced – 1 cup, 4 g

12. Foods fortified with fiber – Multiple foods from yogurt to fruit juices are fortified with fiber. Such foods could help busy people to achieve daily fiber, regardless of type of meal you eat. Food diversity is growing such as consumer interest in foods with functional benefits increases.

Food, Serving, quantity of fiber

- Wheat bread – 1 slice – 5 g
- Rye crisp bread – 2 slices – 4 g
- Fiber-fortified soy milk – 1 cup – 5 g
- Cereals fortified with fiber – 1/3 cup, 10 g

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